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UK Aid Direct: Beneficiaries felt empowered and valued with new feedback mechanisms piloted by DFID

The pilot, ran by World Vision, was designed to look at the effectiveness of beneficiary feedback mechanisms and the value this could add to the project beneficiaries.

The key areas of the pilot focused on:

  • what worked in the design of feedback mechanisms
  • how feedback could improve programmes
  • what process and investment was required from a grant holder perspective

MAMTA – Health Institute for Mother and Child, an organisation working on improving reproductive, maternal and child health services in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, India, was one of the pilot grant holders to share their experiences and findings from the process, in an online discussion with fellow UK Aid Direct grant holders.

MAMTA's feedback box

MAMTA’s feedback box

 

MAMTA, who were slightly sceptical initially regarding the feedback pilot, outlined the importance of using sensitivity with the beneficiaries around the process.

They also highlighted the need to match the right approach to the right context.

Following the success of the project however, MAMTA has rolled out further beneficiary feedback mechanisms into their other projects.

To conclude, findings from the pilot showed that:

  • consulting with beneficiaries and using the feedback to adapt programmes meant that the programmes were more responsive to beneficiary needs and were therefore more relevant and effective.
  • The process of giving feedback empowered beneficiaries and made them feel valued.
  • Feedback also supported accountability of both programme and government service providers.

The results and findings from the pilot can be found here in more detail.  www.feedbackmechanisms.org



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