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To support applicants of the new Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) from the Department for International Development (DFID), the UK Aid Direct team is hosting a webinar.

This will take place on Thursday 20 July 2017 at 10.00 AM GMT and will last approximately 1.5 hours.
During the webinar the UK Aid Direct team will share a presentation on the application process and a question and answer session will then follow.

All interested organisations are welcome to join the webinar but please check if your organisation is eligible (opens in a new window) to apply for the fund.

To register for the webinar please click on this link (opens in a new window).

We may have to schedule another webinar if this proves to be very popular, so we recommend registering as soon as possible.

Guidance documents are also available for the Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) and they are located on the UK Aid Direct website here. These include guidance on eligibility, finances, and project design support, together with further printable guidance on topics including:

  • value for money
  • beneficiary feedback
  • gender
  • definition of marginalised
  • top tips for applicants
  • what having a DFID grant entails
  • reporting on disability

We accept applications at any time for this fund and all applications will be reviewed on a 6-monthly basis.

All applicants which have submitted applications by 30 September 2017 for a Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) will be informed of the outcome in December 2017.


A new challenge fund from the Department for International Development (DFID) designed to strengthen grassroots development organisations working with the poor, vulnerable and most marginalised has been launched.

The Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) will support Britain’s small non-for-profit groups, to scale-up and increase the reach and efficiency of their projects.

Grants of up to £50,000 will be available for projects of up to 2 years, and applications for funding can be submitted from 5 July 2017 via www.ukaiddirect.org.

Applications will be accepted at any time and the first assessment will be in October (and every 6 months thereafter).

To find out if your organisation is eligible to apply visit the ELIGIBILITY section of www.ukaiddirect.org or visit the HOW TO APPLY section.


International Women’s Day 2017 | #BeBoldForChange

 

AmplifyChange Opportunity grantee Think Young Women, Gambia - Haddy Jonga

The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is to #BeBoldForChange, to call on everyone to help forge a better and more gender-inclusive world.

To celebrate the campaign, AmplifyChange grantees have shown their support by sharing pictures and quotes for the ‘#BeBoldForChange’ photo story.

Pictured here is Haddy Jonga, Programme Officer for Opportunity grantee Think Young Women, The Gambia, with Fatima Gomez, one of 60 mentees under the Girl’s Mentorship Programme.

Haddy describes how she is mentoring young girls to be bold for change:

“By being a sister and helping create a safe space to discuss the challenges they face, especially as teenagers.

I believe they will be the change we seek in this world.”

You can find out how more grantees are being bold for change by visiting amplifychange.exposure.co/beboldforchange

Thank you to all AmplifyChange grantees who contributed photos and quotes.


The UK Department for International Development (DFID) published the Civil Society Partnership Review (CSPR) earlier today, alongside the launch of the next UK Aid Direct funding round, which opens for applications on 14 November.

cspr-and-funding-round-launchedThe CSPR defines DFID’s future objectives, approach and instruments for a partnership with civil society in order to deliver more to the world’s poorest.

The CSPR sets out how DFID will use its partnerships with civil society to support delivery of the UK Aid Strategy.

A healthy, vibrant and effective civil society sector is a crucial part of Britain’s soft power and leadership around the world. The Civil Society Partnership Review (CSPR), developed with extensive CSO engagement, considered DFID’s current civil society funding portfolio alongside the changing global context and civil society operating environment.

Factors that are driving fundamental changes in the international development sector include:

  • a rise in the economic and political power of emerging countries
  • rapid urbanisation
  • demographic and climate change
  • changing geographies of conflict and poverty and technology

These changes are having a profound and increasingly rapid impact on the CSO operating environment, and presenting new opportunities and challenges.

Taking account of these changes, the CSPR will lead to a relationship between DFID and civil society organisations (CSOs) that is fit for the future, more strategic and effective; with opportunities for a broad range of CSOs including those in developing countries, a focus on innovation, partnership and increasingly high standards on efficiency, transparency and accountability. This will ultimately deliver more for the world’s poorest and for British taxpayers.

In addition to publishing the review outcomes, funding rounds for two central DFID CSO programmes (UK Aid Match and UK Aid Direct) opened today.

Applications for funding from UK Aid Direct can be submitted from Monday 14 November via ukaiddirect.org.

To find out more about how to apply for this funding round, visit the How to apply section of ukaiddirect.org.


Futures’ Freedom is a project run by AfriKids and supported by a UK Aid Direct Impact Grant to provide advocacy in the rural Upper East Regions of Northern Ghana, where there is a lack of knowledge surrounding SRHR and harmful practices, including child marriage.

The project targets adolescent girls and young women to educate them about their rights and aims to improve communities’ understanding of SRHR by changing attitudes and behaviours through community development work, talks and education.

AfriKids’ approach is to use tried and tested methods to engage all levels of the community in behaviour change. For example, men and women employed as fieldworkers work with beneficiaries in their own communities and health talks involve women and girls alongside men and boys.

Part of the work of this project is to signpost women and girls to healthcare facilities, such as ante-natal and post-natal care and to educate them on family planning.

Another method used by the project is to set up Adolescent Centres in health facilities where adolescents can speak to health care professionals for non-judgemental, confidential SRHR advice.

Child rights clubs have also been established within schools to educate children about the importance of how to respect, fulfil and value SRHR and what to do if their rights, or the rights of somebody they know, are violated. Discussions at the clubs focus around child marriage, sexual health, consent and teenage pregnancy.

The clubs have proved invaluable for more than 10,000 children, who are members through the AfriKids network, and have stopped many children from dropping out of school.

Gloria’s Story

Gloria, 15, is in her final year of Junior High School in the Talensi district. She is a member of her local Futures’ Freedom club and has ambitions to become a nurse.

Gloria has attended a number of talks on child marriage and preventing teenage pregnancy.

Many girls in Gloria’s school dropped out early due to the impracticality of raising babies alongside their studies. Gloria remarked how she believes that “their lives will not be good for them” as a result.

She described how the talks taught her that adolescents should wait until they are ready to start sexual relationships and this has inspired her to remain focused on her education in order to set a good example to her younger siblings.

Gloria will continue to be a part of the clubs until she finishes high school and thanked AfriKids for “continuing to help young people with their education”.

afrikids-futures-freedom-beneficiaries-gloria-and-cece

Gloria, a beneficiary of the AfriKids project and CeCe, a Future’s Freedom fieldworker.

 

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