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International Women’s Day 2017 | #BeBoldForChange

 

AmplifyChange Opportunity grantee Think Young Women, Gambia - Haddy Jonga

The theme for this year’s International Women’s Day is to #BeBoldForChange, to call on everyone to help forge a better and more gender-inclusive world.

To celebrate the campaign, AmplifyChange grantees have shown their support by sharing pictures and quotes for the ‘#BeBoldForChange’ photo story.

Pictured here is Haddy Jonga, Programme Officer for Opportunity grantee Think Young Women, The Gambia, with Fatima Gomez, one of 60 mentees under the Girl’s Mentorship Programme.

Haddy describes how she is mentoring young girls to be bold for change:

“By being a sister and helping create a safe space to discuss the challenges they face, especially as teenagers.

I believe they will be the change we seek in this world.”

You can find out how more grantees are being bold for change by visiting amplifychange.exposure.co/beboldforchange

Thank you to all AmplifyChange grantees who contributed photos and quotes.


Futures’ Freedom is a project run by AfriKids and supported by a UK Aid Direct Impact Grant to provide advocacy in the rural Upper East Regions of Northern Ghana, where there is a lack of knowledge surrounding SRHR and harmful practices, including child marriage.

The project targets adolescent girls and young women to educate them about their rights and aims to improve communities’ understanding of SRHR by changing attitudes and behaviours through community development work, talks and education.

AfriKids’ approach is to use tried and tested methods to engage all levels of the community in behaviour change. For example, men and women employed as fieldworkers work with beneficiaries in their own communities and health talks involve women and girls alongside men and boys.

Part of the work of this project is to signpost women and girls to healthcare facilities, such as ante-natal and post-natal care and to educate them on family planning.

Another method used by the project is to set up Adolescent Centres in health facilities where adolescents can speak to health care professionals for non-judgemental, confidential SRHR advice.

Child rights clubs have also been established within schools to educate children about the importance of how to respect, fulfil and value SRHR and what to do if their rights, or the rights of somebody they know, are violated. Discussions at the clubs focus around child marriage, sexual health, consent and teenage pregnancy.

The clubs have proved invaluable for more than 10,000 children, who are members through the AfriKids network, and have stopped many children from dropping out of school.

Gloria’s Story

Gloria, 15, is in her final year of Junior High School in the Talensi district. She is a member of her local Futures’ Freedom club and has ambitions to become a nurse.

Gloria has attended a number of talks on child marriage and preventing teenage pregnancy.

Many girls in Gloria’s school dropped out early due to the impracticality of raising babies alongside their studies. Gloria remarked how she believes that “their lives will not be good for them” as a result.

She described how the talks taught her that adolescents should wait until they are ready to start sexual relationships and this has inspired her to remain focused on her education in order to set a good example to her younger siblings.

Gloria will continue to be a part of the clubs until she finishes high school and thanked AfriKids for “continuing to help young people with their education”.

afrikids-futures-freedom-beneficiaries-gloria-and-cece

Gloria, a beneficiary of the AfriKids project and CeCe, a Future’s Freedom fieldworker.

 

www.afrikids.org

facebook.com/afrikids

Twitter: @afrikids

 


The pilot, ran by World Vision, was designed to look at the effectiveness of beneficiary feedback mechanisms and the value this could add to the project beneficiaries.

The key areas of the pilot focused on:

  • what worked in the design of feedback mechanisms
  • how feedback could improve programmes
  • what process and investment was required from a grant holder perspective

MAMTA – Health Institute for Mother and Child, an organisation working on improving reproductive, maternal and child health services in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, India, was one of the pilot grant holders to share their experiences and findings from the process, in an online discussion with fellow UK Aid Direct grant holders.

MAMTA's feedback box

MAMTA’s feedback box

 

MAMTA, who were slightly sceptical initially regarding the feedback pilot, outlined the importance of using sensitivity with the beneficiaries around the process.

They also highlighted the need to match the right approach to the right context.

Following the success of the project however, MAMTA has rolled out further beneficiary feedback mechanisms into their other projects.

To conclude, findings from the pilot showed that:

  • consulting with beneficiaries and using the feedback to adapt programmes meant that the programmes were more responsive to beneficiary needs and were therefore more relevant and effective.
  • The process of giving feedback empowered beneficiaries and made them feel valued.
  • Feedback also supported accountability of both programme and government service providers.

The results and findings from the pilot can be found here in more detail.  www.feedbackmechanisms.org


InternationalWomensDay-landscape rsz

To celebrate International Women’s Day 2016 we are delighted to highlight the work of four grant holders supported by UK Aid Direct and AmplifyChange.

UK aid logo

UK Aid Direct is DFID’s central funding mechanism for awarding grants to small and medium sized UK and International Civil Society Organisations working to reduce poverty overseas and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals.

Meet one of our UK Aid Direct grant holders:

mothers2mothers work towards ending paediatric HIV transmission by training a network of Mentor Mothers to provide health and social care to other HIV-positive mothers, supporting them to protect their babies from infection and keep themselves and their families healthy.

 

AmplifyChange

AmplifyChange is a multi-donor fund that supports civil society advocacy for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR).

Meet our AmplifyChange grantees:

Association for the Promotion of Women (AVAF) are a Cameroon-based advocacy group promoting the human rights of lesbians in Cameroon and to challenge human right violations and stigma that lesbians encounter in the country.

Rede de Defesa dos Direitos Sexuais e Reprodutivos (DSR) is a network of Mozambican health , gender justice and legal NGOs working to strengthen SRHR across the country.

 

 


We are delighted to have two new donors join in support to AmplifyChange.  Norad (the Norwegian Agency for International Development) and DFID (the UK’s Department for International Development) join the multi-donor fund to support civil society advocacy across Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

In collaboration with Denmark and alongside the Netherlands, the Hewlett and Packard Foundations and ViiV Healthcare, this increased funding from two new donors will help ensure a larger and more predictable flow of support to civil society groups working on the most difficult issues. AmplifyChange grantees address a broader range of sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender issues that determine opportunity and well-being for girls and young women.

MannionDaniels leads a consortium as the Fund Manager for AmplifyChange, working closely with our partners the Global Fund for Women and the African Women’s Development Fund.  More information can be found on amplifychange.org.

UK aid and Norad support