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A new challenge fund from the Department for International Development (DFID) designed to strengthen grassroots development organisations working with the poor, vulnerable and most marginalised has been launched.

The Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) will support Britain’s small non-for-profit groups, to scale-up and increase the reach and efficiency of their projects.

Grants of up to £50,000 will be available for projects of up to 2 years, and applications for funding can be submitted from 5 July 2017 via www.ukaiddirect.org.

Applications will be accepted at any time and the first assessment will be in October (and every 6 months thereafter).

To find out if your organisation is eligible to apply visit the ELIGIBILITY section of www.ukaiddirect.org or visit the HOW TO APPLY section.


The MannionDaniels team, led by Director David Daniels, conducted the Annual Review of the Delivering Increased Family Planning Across Rural Kenya (DIFPARK) programme in January 2014.  With funding from DFID, DIFPARK is designed to respond to the needs of the Government of Kenya in reducing unmet need and increasing the contraceptive prevalence rate. Its overall goal is to increase FP uptake in Kenya with the impact of reducing maternal and newborn deaths. The programme intends to increase new users of family planning, primarily through the private sector, utilising a total market approach and providing complementary support to the public sector to ensure the provision of quality FP services. It has been designed with specific emphasis on increasing access to family planning by rural women and young adolescent girls (15-19 years of age).  The programme is managed by a consortium led by the Futures group and includes Jhpiego, JHU-CCP, Save the Children, Exp Social Marketing and Well Told Story.  The programme operates across 23 counties.  The annual review assessed progress under the first phase of programme implementation and provided an overview of progress as well as recommendations to the programme management agent.


MannionDaniels conducted a review of DFID’s £57 million Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme, including HIV/AIDS, in Zimbabwe in 2014. This involved assessing the technical and value-for-money aspects of the programme, which spanned both private and public sector support, and whose objectives include:

  • Providing over 2.2 million Couple Years of Protection (CYPs), helping avert more than 800,000 unintended pregnancies
  • Providing HIV testing and counselling for more that 400,000 people in priority populations
  • Providing Antiretroviral treatment for 1200 people living with HIV and AIDS, targeted at marginalised populations, including 500 sex workers and their children

The team also designed a business case for re-allocated and new funding for SRH services, and assessed coordination mechanisms and operational issues.

DFID works with other donors in Zimbabwe to provide the Integrated Support Programme, partnering with both the private and the public sectors to provide integrated SRH and HIV/AIDS services.  This includes:  distribution of condoms and other FP commodities, carrying out voluntary male medical circumcision, provision of cervical cancer screening, and providing services for survivors of gender-based violence.


 

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MannionDaniels has just completed a review of DFID’s £57 million Sexual and Reproductive Health Programme, including HIV/AIDS, in Zimbabwe. This involved assessing the technical and value-for-money aspects of the current programme. The team also designed a business case for re-allocated and new funding for SRH services. The review was contracted through DFID’s HEART service (Health and Education Advice and Resource Team).

DFID works with other donors in Zimbabwe to provide the Integrated Support Programme, partnering with both the private and the public sectors to provide integrated SRH and HIV/AIDS services. This includes:  distribution of condoms and other FP commodities, carrying out voluntary male medical circumcision, provision of HIV testing and ARV treatment for positive patients, provision of cervical cancer screening, and providing services for survivors of gender-based violence.


MannionDaniels was contracted by HEART (Health and Education Advice and Resource Team, funded by DfID and managed by Oxford Policy Management) to conduct a Mid-Term Review of Nepal’s second Health Sector Programme (NHSP II).  The Government of Nepal launched NHSP II, which is a 5-year programme in July 2010. The agreement to finance and support the programme of work in NHSP II was formalised in a Joint Financing Arrangement using a Sector Wide Approach. A Mid-Term Review of NHSPII is required in line with these commitments made by the Government of Nepal, external development partners and civil society.

Nepal’s health system faces post-conflict challenges after emerging from a ten-year civil war in 2006 which halved potential economic growth. It must navigate a complex set of interrelated factors including: gender; caste; ethnicity; age; religion; disability; language; geography; corruption and poor infrastructure, all of which impact on the provision and accessibility of health services.  Despite these challenges, Nepal has experienced two decades of steady improvement in health outcomes. Progress accelerated and was accompanied by significant improvements in equality of access during the first NHSP (2004-10) and Nepal is now on track to meet the child and maternal mortality MDGs and it is estimated that NHSP1 saved 96,000 deaths and nearly 3.2 million disability-adjusted life years (DALYs).

NHSP II represents a continuation and refinement of earlier policies and plans based on implementation of cost-effective, evidence-based health interventions, some free of charge.  NHSP II’s vision is to improve the health and nutritional status of all Nepali people, especially the poor and excluded. Three main objectives in the NHSP II results framework are:

  1. Increase access to and utilisation of a package of quality essential health care services;
  2. Reduce cultural and economic barriers to accessing health care services and harmful cultural practices in partnership with non-state actors.  Fundamental to this objective is the implementation of the Gender Equality and Social Inclusion Strategy;
  3. Improve the health system to achieve universal coverage of essential health services. Fundamental to this objective is the implementation of the Governance and Accountability Action Plan.

David Daniels, Director at MannionDaniels, is leading a team of consultants contracted by Oxford Policy Management to assess progress on delivering NHSPII’s objectives. The team are undertaking a series of in-depth consultations with a broad range of health sector stakeholders to inform quantitative and qualitative measurement of progress across the following nine output areas:

  • Improved service delivery
  • Improved sector management
  • Improved health governance and financial management
  • Reduced cultural and economic barriers to accessing health care services
  • Strengthened human resources for health
  • Increased health knowledge and awareness
  • Improved M&E and health information systems
  • Improved physical assets and logistics management
  • Improved sustainable health financing

Broad based consultations with all stakeholders in the sector will be emphasised, as will collecting opinions from different client groups including those from more vulnerable or disadvantaged situations.

Findings from the MTR were presented at the Joint Annual Review in January 2013.