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To support applicants of the new Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) from the Department for International Development (DFID), the UK Aid Direct team is hosting a webinar.

This will take place on Thursday 20 July 2017 at 10.00 AM GMT and will last approximately 1.5 hours.
During the webinar the UK Aid Direct team will share a presentation on the application process and a question and answer session will then follow.

All interested organisations are welcome to join the webinar but please check if your organisation is eligible (opens in a new window) to apply for the fund.

To register for the webinar please click on this link (opens in a new window).

We may have to schedule another webinar if this proves to be very popular, so we recommend registering as soon as possible.

Guidance documents are also available for the Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) and they are located on the UK Aid Direct website here. These include guidance on eligibility, finances, and project design support, together with further printable guidance on topics including:

  • value for money
  • beneficiary feedback
  • gender
  • definition of marginalised
  • top tips for applicants
  • what having a DFID grant entails
  • reporting on disability

We accept applications at any time for this fund and all applications will be reviewed on a 6-monthly basis.

All applicants which have submitted applications by 30 September 2017 for a Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) will be informed of the outcome in December 2017.


A new challenge fund from the Department for International Development (DFID) designed to strengthen grassroots development organisations working with the poor, vulnerable and most marginalised has been launched.

The Small Charities Challenge Fund (SCCF) will support Britain’s small non-for-profit groups, to scale-up and increase the reach and efficiency of their projects.

Grants of up to £50,000 will be available for projects of up to 2 years, and applications for funding can be submitted from 5 July 2017 via www.ukaiddirect.org.

Applications will be accepted at any time and the first assessment will be in October (and every 6 months thereafter).

To find out if your organisation is eligible to apply visit the ELIGIBILITY section of www.ukaiddirect.org or visit the HOW TO APPLY section.


Futures’ Freedom is a project run by AfriKids and supported by a UK Aid Direct Impact Grant to provide advocacy in the rural Upper East Regions of Northern Ghana, where there is a lack of knowledge surrounding SRHR and harmful practices, including child marriage.

The project targets adolescent girls and young women to educate them about their rights and aims to improve communities’ understanding of SRHR by changing attitudes and behaviours through community development work, talks and education.

AfriKids’ approach is to use tried and tested methods to engage all levels of the community in behaviour change. For example, men and women employed as fieldworkers work with beneficiaries in their own communities and health talks involve women and girls alongside men and boys.

Part of the work of this project is to signpost women and girls to healthcare facilities, such as ante-natal and post-natal care and to educate them on family planning.

Another method used by the project is to set up Adolescent Centres in health facilities where adolescents can speak to health care professionals for non-judgemental, confidential SRHR advice.

Child rights clubs have also been established within schools to educate children about the importance of how to respect, fulfil and value SRHR and what to do if their rights, or the rights of somebody they know, are violated. Discussions at the clubs focus around child marriage, sexual health, consent and teenage pregnancy.

The clubs have proved invaluable for more than 10,000 children, who are members through the AfriKids network, and have stopped many children from dropping out of school.

Gloria’s Story

Gloria, 15, is in her final year of Junior High School in the Talensi district. She is a member of her local Futures’ Freedom club and has ambitions to become a nurse.

Gloria has attended a number of talks on child marriage and preventing teenage pregnancy.

Many girls in Gloria’s school dropped out early due to the impracticality of raising babies alongside their studies. Gloria remarked how she believes that “their lives will not be good for them” as a result.

She described how the talks taught her that adolescents should wait until they are ready to start sexual relationships and this has inspired her to remain focused on her education in order to set a good example to her younger siblings.

Gloria will continue to be a part of the clubs until she finishes high school and thanked AfriKids for “continuing to help young people with their education”.

afrikids-futures-freedom-beneficiaries-gloria-and-cece

Gloria, a beneficiary of the AfriKids project and CeCe, a Future’s Freedom fieldworker.

 

www.afrikids.org

facebook.com/afrikids

Twitter: @afrikids

 


Pavitra cares for her son who has epilepsy.  She was previously a migrant labourer; a challenging role, especially given her son’s condition.

Pavitra has been given a goat by Carers Worldwide, an organisation funded by UK Aid Direct, that works in Nepal with local partner, LEADS Nepal.

This is Pavitra with her son and goats.

This is Pavitra with her son and goats.

 

Carers Worldwide provides support to 1500 unpaid family carers of people living with mental health conditions or epilepsy.

Now Pavitra receives a regular income, allowing her to settle in the village with her son, and to start her own livelihood.

Carers’ tremendous commitment and the critical role that they play in the lives of relatives with mental health conditions are largely unrecognised in Nepal.

Unsupported, they can be isolated and are at a high risk of developing anxiety or depression and physical ailments, as a direct consequence of their caring responsibilities. Many carers are unable to continue their previous employment.

Child carers are frequently forced to drop out of school.

Carers and their families typically live in poverty as a result of loss of income and opportunities.

Carers Worldwide project aims to:

  • strengthen medical and counselling facilities for carers
  • promote mutual support groups
  • set up alternative care and respite arrangements
  • provide livelihoods and opportunities to develop marketable skills
  • highlight the needs of carers
  • advocate for changes in policy and practice

Improving the lives and prospects of carers has a positive effect on the lives of the relatives with mental health conditions for whom they care. The carers are able to provide a better quality of care and the overall increase in wellbeing and security of the household has huge knock-on benefits for the health and wellbeing of the relative living with a mental health condition or epilepsy.

By highlighting the existence and needs of carers across the project area with local government authorities and community organisations, over the last two years Carers Worldwide has:

  • integrated 400 carers into support groups
  • trained 200 local community health volunteers and 64 government health workers to provide appropriate health support
  • established regular counselling services in the community
  • trained and supported over 750 carers in skills and helped them to establish new sustainable livelihoods that can work with their caring responsibilities
  • provided 225 child carers with ongoing support from school authorities, enabling them to return to school
  • raised 44% of project households above the poverty line, compared to 3% at the start of the project
  • registered two Carers Associations and one Carers Cooperative to enable carers to advocate for policy change, and to work with local agencies to ensure sustainability of services established by the project.

To find out more about their work, visit www.carersworldwide.org

 


The pilot, ran by World Vision, was designed to look at the effectiveness of beneficiary feedback mechanisms and the value this could add to the project beneficiaries.

The key areas of the pilot focused on:

  • what worked in the design of feedback mechanisms
  • how feedback could improve programmes
  • what process and investment was required from a grant holder perspective

MAMTA – Health Institute for Mother and Child, an organisation working on improving reproductive, maternal and child health services in two districts of Uttar Pradesh, India, was one of the pilot grant holders to share their experiences and findings from the process, in an online discussion with fellow UK Aid Direct grant holders.

MAMTA's feedback box

MAMTA’s feedback box

 

MAMTA, who were slightly sceptical initially regarding the feedback pilot, outlined the importance of using sensitivity with the beneficiaries around the process.

They also highlighted the need to match the right approach to the right context.

Following the success of the project however, MAMTA has rolled out further beneficiary feedback mechanisms into their other projects.

To conclude, findings from the pilot showed that:

  • consulting with beneficiaries and using the feedback to adapt programmes meant that the programmes were more responsive to beneficiary needs and were therefore more relevant and effective.
  • The process of giving feedback empowered beneficiaries and made them feel valued.
  • Feedback also supported accountability of both programme and government service providers.

The results and findings from the pilot can be found here in more detail.  www.feedbackmechanisms.org